1. teehee mothefucker

    teehee mothefucker

  2. the-absolute-best-posts:


This post has been featured on a 1000notes.com blog.

    the-absolute-best-posts:

    This post has been featured on a 1000notes.com blog.

    (Source: tttwooms, via the-absolute-best-posts)

  3. 10. You might meet someone

    …and you might meet more than once—through a friend or a friend of a friend. You might meet every week, every time there’s a new occasion, a new dinner party, a new birthday to celebrate. You might meet when you need a ride to the station when it’s dark out. You might meet  while you’re browsing the frozen foods section at Jusco. You might squash the melons they just bought. You might meet, staying up late, watching Motherfucker Jones on the laptop. You might meet their parents, and they might meet yours.

    Why this reality was necessary: Then, you might meet them after ten months. Might.

  4. The due date for this was like one year ago

    9 Realities of going on Exchange

    1. You will get sick.

    From the very start of my trip, my mother made sure to pack me vitamins for every day I’d be abroad, to make sure I wouldn’t end up sick and helpless overseas. I didn’t take them, and given my extremely tough immune system, I was wheezing, sniffing and groaning within just the second week.

    Why this reality was necessary: If I didn’t get sick, I wouldn’t have known how some people still had the natural tendency to “be nice”. Some people really will still help you out, even if you can’t give them anything back. I received traditional curing agents from 3 different nationalities and took the advice of local beverage vendors on which herbal drinks on the menu would help me out.

    I felt better within the week.

    2. You will clean.

    One of the songs you should put on your Exchange playlist is “Dirrrty” by Christina Aguilera, you’ll have something apt to sing while you’re taking out the trash, sweeping, mopping, washing, soaping, drying, toilet scrubbing and hair/dust-collecting. Did I mention the occasional cockroach killing? Remember that you’re living in a house with people in their 20s. People in their 20s don’t clean, cause YOLO!

    Why this reality was necessary: As a Filipino, you’ll finally understand why foreigners are keen on hiring Filipino house helpers. We have a very low tolerance for dirt and clutter in the home, as a culture. So, I played “house maid” and cleaned the house top to bottom around 2-3 times a week. It really makes you realize how much help helpers actually provide a household, so I told them about my new talent—that of turning a yellow toilet into a white one.

    3. People will be racist.

    Asian, Southeast Asian, Filipino, you are at the bottom of the food chain whether you like it or not and people will bring on the racial discrimination from time to time. A man of another culture snapped his fingers at me as a means of beckoning me over, once. “Would you like a black eye with your order, Sir?”

    Why this reality was necessary: Whether we like to admit it or not, Filipinos are so racist. We call other cultures names behind their backs, it’s true, and then we expect them not to look down on us? In addition, meeting people of other cultures dispelled pre-conceived notions I had about them, positively. Some of the most seemingly notorious people in the world may turn out to be just some of the nicest. One example is a close friend of mine, who, I recently found out, is related to Osama bin Laden by blood. He took care of us the whole time we were abroad, so naturally, that last fact was moot.

    4. You will learn self-defense.

    You will walk through shady streets at night, whether you want to or not. You can always say you won’t go out at night but you will, when all your house mates want to go out, and the worse option would be for you to stay home alone at night. If you’re a girl, you’ll receive an average of 3-5 hoots/yells/whistles and various ineffective mating calls in a day.

    Why this reality was necessary: Nothing else would have driven me to learn a martial art via YouTube, or carry a small knife in my purse (which came in handy on some occasions, although all of these were to open tough food packets).

    5. You will scrimp, whenever you can.

    You will discover the wonder that is “hostels” and “B&B”s and wonder why your parents ever paid PhP5000 a night on family vacations when your whole stay cost just RM50 (Php 700).

    Grocery shopping will be a challenge, especially when you’re converting everything into your country’s currency to check if you can afford to buy it.

    Why this reality was necessary: I only used 60% of the projected expenditure my parents prepared for me. I was pretty guilty asking my parents to fund me for this whole trip, so this really was the least I could do for them in return.

    6. You will improvise.

    You will make a door lock out of hangers. You will use a laundry bag as a pillow case to ensure pillow hygiene. You will use instant noodles as base for tomato sauce because they cost less.

    You will be tempted to wear a scarf over your head and face when it gets too hot, and you will give in.

    Why this reality was necessary: What’s not good about learning how to be resourceful?

    7. You will eat.

    Malaysia has 3 different cultures: Malay, Chinese and Indian; 4 if you include a burgeoning population of Middle Eastern students, mostly from Iran and Yemen. All of these have dishes that I can’t help but miss, especially at the low price of RM 5-6, roughly PhP70-80 when converted, plus drink and take-out!

    Why this reality was necessary: Malaysia is known for spicy food, and makes people who are uncomfortable with spicy food very nervous. The truth is, their spicy food was excruciating. I thought I was good with spicy food (hot sauce on pizza), but that is nothing compared to Malaysia-spicy. People often forget though, that there are spice-intolerant-friendly dishes that are just as well known and taste extremely good. Duck mee hoon, anyone?

    8. You will have a s***load of kwento.

    Random kwento #1: I rode a motorcycle for the first time in my life. The owner was a friend of mine who allowed me to sit on the back. She just so happened to be of German descent, born in Russia and studying in Malaysia. And off we rode into the tropical night air, her newly purchased Indian saree flying in the wind!

    Random kwento #2: I once forgot my toothbrush when we stayed over at a friend’s place. He said not to worry, and handed me a twig (I forgot what it was called, but people really use it to brush their teeth) with which to brush my teeth. I woke up with fresh breath and no tooth decay.

    Random kwento #3: During my last week in Malaysia, we decided to try out one of the local clubbing areas at The Zon. It was very different from the typical clubbing scene in Manila, as nobody was dancing, and everyone was just standing at their tables, drinking their RM10 (PhP 140) beers—thanks to Sin Tax! The best part of “clubbing” in Malaysia was when the DJ cut the music and this rowdy accolade ensued:

    DJ: Alright everybody cheer!

    Crowd: WHOO

    DJ: Old MacDonald had a farm!

    Crowd: EE AY EE AY OH!

    I guess Nursery Rhymes is the new Busta Rhymez.

    Why this reality was necessary: Who doesn’t love listening to stories, especially when they are not only peculiar, but of worth? Keep in mind, these are stories you will not only be telling your friends and family now, but possibly your future children. Speaking of children, did I tell you about the time a snake fell out of a tree and landed next to a friend of mine who was caught unaware?

    9. You will leave eventually.

    Some of you will be happy to leave. You will be glad to go back to all the comforts of home, and to the company of your friends and family back home. Some of you will be sad to leave. You will have met and gotten close to new people who you will say goodbye to, and as your cab to the airport drives off, you think “I will never see this person again in my life.” You will cry when you leave, and when you get back home to your room, before you close your eyes, you will try to keep it open as long as you can, because you’re still not sure whether that 6 weeks really just happened.

    Why this reality was necessary: You will wake up in the morning. You will register that this is the first time in a long time that you’ve slept in your bed. You will go on Facebook, and see all the pictures you took, all the new friend requests, all the wall posts saying “We miss you already!” to which you will reply “Come visit me in Manila!”, and it’ll feel as if you  never left them in the first place.

    The author is Patricia Anne R. Sim, 4th year BS Architecture Student who went on a 6-week AIESEC Exchange Program to Johor Bahru, Malaysia.

  5. Nothing, just sand in my eye.

    Sand on the shore never stays for good.
    New sand comes along, old sand is swept away.
    We cling to the hope that maybe we’ll see the old sand again.
    But who are we to argue
    With the command the Ocean holds over us.

  6. la gaudière

    dictionaryofobscuresorrows:

    n. the glint of goodness inside people, which you can only find by sloshing them back and forth in your mind until everything dark and gray and common falls away, leaving behind a constellation at the bottom of the pan—a rare element trapped in exposed bedrock, washed there by a storm somewhere upstream.

  7. la gaudière

    dictionaryofobscuresorrows:

    n. the glint of goodness inside people, which you can only find by sloshing them back and forth in your mind until everything dark and gray and common falls away, leaving behind a constellation at the bottom of the pan—a rare element trapped in exposed bedrock, washed there by a storm somewhere upstream.

  8. thekhooll:

Temple
The temple building at Wulong Natural Rock Bridges, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Chongqing Municipality, China.  Wulong is located at the southeast of Chongqing, 170 kilometres from Chongqing City.  

    thekhooll:

    Temple

    The temple building at Wulong Natural Rock Bridges, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Chongqing Municipality, China.  Wulong is located at the southeast of Chongqing, 170 kilometres from Chongqing City.  

  9. takahatagagaga:

ゾートロープ Disco the ONI

somebunny misses you!

    takahatagagaga:

    ゾートロープ Disco the ONI

    somebunny misses you!

    (via chocolatebreadfishes)

  10. catrinastewart:

    Orly Hangar - Felix Candela.  

    The hyperbolic parabolic forms became Candela’s hallmark and he built many factories and churches around Mexico City using these forms.

    (via fuckyesbuildings)

About

Hi, I am Patricia! And instead of introducing myself, I will say that most of my posts reflect who I am anyway, so, take it upon yourself to find out.

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